14th Apr 2013
Psychological Basis for the Color of Love
Red has long been associated with love around the world, and in studies conducted in 2008 and 2010, psychologists at the University of Rochester — including Daniela Niesta Kayser, pictured above — gave the color scientific backing when they showed that both men and women find the color red more sexually appealing than other colors. One type of experiment showed the subject a black-and-white photo of a person, framed in various colors; another varied the shirt color of the person in the photo. (The photos were digitally manipulated to ensure consistency, and the colors were precisely matched in saturation and brightness levels, differing only in hue.) Subjects were then asked to rate the person in the photo based on different characteristics. Consistently, photo subjects framed in red or wearing red were rated as significantly more attractive and sexually desirable than those framed in or wearing other colors. The results from one experiment in the 2008 study showed that men expressed a willingness to spend more money while on a date if the woman was wearing red. However, the presence/absence of red did not change how men or women rated the subject of the photo in terms of likability, intelligence, or kindness. In addition, the studies showed that red had an effect on a straight man or woman only when shown a person of the opposite gender. The presence/absence of red didn’t affect how straight men and women rated the attractiveness of someone of the same gender. But what about men and women who don’t identify as straight? Perhaps further research will explore how red affects members of the LGBT community when rating people of the same and opposite genders.
(Image Credit: University of Rochester)
Guest Post written by lizhasthoughts

Psychological Basis for the Color of Love

Red has long been associated with love around the world, and in studies conducted in 2008 and 2010, psychologists at the University of Rochester — including Daniela Niesta Kayser, pictured above — gave the color scientific backing when they showed that both men and women find the color red more sexually appealing than other colors. One type of experiment showed the subject a black-and-white photo of a person, framed in various colors; another varied the shirt color of the person in the photo. (The photos were digitally manipulated to ensure consistency, and the colors were precisely matched in saturation and brightness levels, differing only in hue.) Subjects were then asked to rate the person in the photo based on different characteristics. Consistently, photo subjects framed in red or wearing red were rated as significantly more attractive and sexually desirable than those framed in or wearing other colors. The results from one experiment in the 2008 study showed that men expressed a willingness to spend more money while on a date if the woman was wearing red. However, the presence/absence of red did not change how men or women rated the subject of the photo in terms of likability, intelligence, or kindness. In addition, the studies showed that red had an effect on a straight man or woman only when shown a person of the opposite gender. The presence/absence of red didn’t affect how straight men and women rated the attractiveness of someone of the same gender. But what about men and women who don’t identify as straight? Perhaps further research will explore how red affects members of the LGBT community when rating people of the same and opposite genders.

(Image Credit: University of Rochester)

Guest Post written by lizhasthoughts

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  21. kirianyx reblogged this from sciencesoup and added:
    Looks like I should wear more red ;)
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