25th Oct 2012
The Science of Halloween: ‘Lunacy’ and the Full Moon
The Moon takes approximately 28 days to orbit the Earth, and it appears to goes through phases as it moves in relation to the light of the sun. Folk wisdom says that people act crazier than usual during a full Moon, and indeed the word “lunacy” is actually derived from the latin word for Moon, Luna. People claim that at full moons, not only do werewolves come out to play, but also depression, suicides, stabbings, traffic accidents and criminal activity rates rise. Surveys have found that over a third of the US population believe that the phase of the Moon affects human behaviour, and this percentage is even higher among mental health professionals (eighty!). But opinion counts for nothing when 99 percent of the evidence points the opposite way. Thousands of studies over the last half-century have looked into this issue, and although occasionally some have shown a correlation between phases and human behaviour, thorough follow-ups always disprove it. The main theory for why the Moon would affect humans is its grativational pull: it has an enormous effect on the tides, and since humans are about 80% water, it’s been suggested that the Moon must have a “biological-tide” effect on us too. This is doesn’t hold water at all, because the amount of water inside of us is so tiny compared to the oceans that a mosquito sitting on our arm literally exerts a more powerful gravitational pull on us than the Moon. But there is a more plausible theory that could explain the origin of this myth: a full moon means more light. The night is 250 times brighter with a full moon than no moon at all, so in times when there were no artificial lights, people would likely stay up later when there was a full moon. If more people are out, then clearly there’s a far greater chance of mischief and things going wrong.

The Science of Halloween: ‘Lunacy’ and the Full Moon

The Moon takes approximately 28 days to orbit the Earth, and it appears to goes through phases as it moves in relation to the light of the sun. Folk wisdom says that people act crazier than usual during a full Moon, and indeed the word “lunacy” is actually derived from the latin word for Moon, Luna. People claim that at full moons, not only do werewolves come out to play, but also depression, suicides, stabbings, traffic accidents and criminal activity rates rise. Surveys have found that over a third of the US population believe that the phase of the Moon affects human behaviour, and this percentage is even higher among mental health professionals (eighty!). But opinion counts for nothing when 99 percent of the evidence points the opposite way. Thousands of studies over the last half-century have looked into this issue, and although occasionally some have shown a correlation between phases and human behaviour, thorough follow-ups always disprove it. The main theory for why the Moon would affect humans is its grativational pull: it has an enormous effect on the tides, and since humans are about 80% water, it’s been suggested that the Moon must have a “biological-tide” effect on us too. This is doesn’t hold water at all, because the amount of water inside of us is so tiny compared to the oceans that a mosquito sitting on our arm literally exerts a more powerful gravitational pull on us than the Moon. But there is a more plausible theory that could explain the origin of this myth: a full moon means more light. The night is 250 times brighter with a full moon than no moon at all, so in times when there were no artificial lights, people would likely stay up later when there was a full moon. If more people are out, then clearly there’s a far greater chance of mischief and things going wrong.

This post has 197 notes
  1. manatheology reblogged this from radiantluminescense
  2. 21lib reblogged this from sciencesoup
  3. masterchick117 reblogged this from sciencesoup
  4. beardsandbedsteads reblogged this from impulsesss
  5. dianarossweave reblogged this from newsolstice
  6. newsolstice reblogged this from sciencesoup
  7. fluro-galaxy reblogged this from sciencesoup
  8. ceeceezigs reblogged this from sciencesoup
  9. ralexsparrow reblogged this from parkstepp
  10. effigyemporium reblogged this from gnarlysnarly
  11. forgottentime457 reblogged this from sciencesoup
  12. mrfunfun reblogged this from sciencesoup
  13. letssketchdeath reblogged this from sciencesoup
  14. swofabysmalkids reblogged this from ztdofabysmalkids
  15. noodlespresso reblogged this from sciencesoup
  16. lewizardnerd reblogged this from elektrikmayhem
  17. elektrikmayhem reblogged this from radiantluminescense
  18. thedifferentd reblogged this from parkstepp
  19. adorabledeathray reblogged this from sciencesoup
  20. lvgratitude reblogged this from sciencesoup
  21. take--me--to--bluer--skies reblogged this from foreverseekingtruth
  22. foreverseekingtruth reblogged this from leavinghollis
  23. leavinghollis reblogged this from sciencesoup
  24. houseof1000lesbians reblogged this from sciencesoup
  25. quadrillion reblogged this from theantidote
  26. luthienlefay reblogged this from sciencesoup
  27. ericadominguez reblogged this from sciencesoup
  28. doodleholic reblogged this from sciencesoup
  29. babblingbrooke211 reblogged this from sciencesoup
  30. impulsesss reblogged this from sciencesoup
  31. delmoilex reblogged this from sciencesoup
  32. tmflake reblogged this from sciencesoup
  33. gabbehgabbeh reblogged this from theantidote