16th Sep 2012
This could mean a few things but I am interpreting it as “suspended animation y/y?”
The short answer: totally.
In certain circumstances, the human body seems to have the ability to hibernate, cheating death by entering a sort of state of suspended animation. A few years back, a Japanese hiker fell in an ice-cold field on Japan’s Rokko Mountain, then spent the next 24 days unconscious without eating or drinking. When he was found, he had no detectable pulse or breathing, and a body temperature of 21 degrees Celsius—but when he was taken to hospital, he woke up. He’s not the only one: in 1999, a Norwegian skier spent an hour in icy water and was declared clinically dead, only to revive in hospital.
So, the human body has the potential to bring the machinery of life to a halt, and this would be a powerful tool if we could harness it. Researchers have already been able to artificially induce “hibernation” in animals and then revive them without harm, by either using low temperatures or chemicals—and human testing isn’t far off.
The applications aren’t just in lengthy space travel, putting astronauts in suspended animation for years until they reach their destination. First and foremost, the technology can be applied in medicine. If there was a way to put heart attack or stroke victim into suspended animation until they can reach the operating room, thousands of lives could be saved.
Must watch: Mark Roth’s TED talk, discussing the medical applications

This could mean a few things but I am interpreting it as “suspended animation y/y?”

The short answer: totally.

In certain circumstances, the human body seems to have the ability to hibernate, cheating death by entering a sort of state of suspended animation. A few years back, a Japanese hiker fell in an ice-cold field on Japan’s Rokko Mountain, then spent the next 24 days unconscious without eating or drinking. When he was found, he had no detectable pulse or breathing, and a body temperature of 21 degrees Celsius—but when he was taken to hospital, he woke up. He’s not the only one: in 1999, a Norwegian skier spent an hour in icy water and was declared clinically dead, only to revive in hospital.

So, the human body has the potential to bring the machinery of life to a halt, and this would be a powerful tool if we could harness it. Researchers have already been able to artificially induce “hibernation” in animals and then revive them without harm, by either using low temperatures or chemicals—and human testing isn’t far off.

The applications aren’t just in lengthy space travel, putting astronauts in suspended animation for years until they reach their destination. First and foremost, the technology can be applied in medicine. If there was a way to put heart attack or stroke victim into suspended animation until they can reach the operating room, thousands of lives could be saved.

Must watch: Mark Roth’s TED talk, discussing the medical applications

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    THIS. IS. AWESOME.